Twitter Expert Directory

Human trafficking: the dark side of migration
Human traffickers lure desperate people with promises of a better life, but many of their victims end up in misery, prostitution, or even dead. During the Lab in Nairobi, anti-trafficking practitioners from around the globe met with survivors, listened to their stories and discussed ways to fight this global scourge.

“Man often becomes what he believes himself to be. If I keep on saying to myself that I cannot do a certain thing, it is possible that I may end by really becoming incapable of doing it. On the contrary, if I have the belief that I can do it, I shall surely acquire the capacity to do it even if I may not have it at the beginning.”
- Mahatma Gandhi

I often thought of this quote during the Lab on human trafficking in Nairobi in June 2018, organised by the Global Leadership Academy (GLAC) and the Thomson Reuters Foundation (TRF). The same Gandhian spirit was ever present at this Lab, convincing me from the beginning that I had come to the right place. Just a few hours into the Lab, I observed how passionate everyone was on this issue of human trafficking and what we could do, together, to tackle this scourge.

We were a very diverse group. Among us was an anti-trafficking activist from Kolkata, India; a vocal Tunisian currently doing her Master’s in Germany; a rape survivor who set up her own foundation in Uganda; and senior representatives from the African Union Commission and the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights. It was an amazing network of passionate anti-trafficking practitioners that I would be able to benefit from, not to mention the resources and training provided at the Lab.

We discussed the difference between smuggling and trafficking, the various forms of trafficking vs. child trafficking, and human and organ trafficking. We established that this ugly phenomenon cannot be understood, let alone fought, without examining the root causes that lead people to seek a better life abroad, such as poverty, unemployment and a lack of knowledge about one’s basic human rights.

The GLAC’s and TRF’s excellent facilitators provided media training, including on messaging for campaigns, how to interview trafficking victims and survivors, and effectively leverage social media. Thanks to their facilitation, we identified the complexities inherent in the trafficking situation on the African continent, including the need for credible information sources and the efficient use of facts and data to tell stories. What I found poignant was that several journalists taking part in the Lab requested that their names and identities not be revealed out of fear for their own safety.

The facilitators were candid and provided useful antidotes as well as plenty of examples to counter and check fake news on social media. An interesting point made by Melanie Cheary from the TRF was that it was necessary to fact-check information long before the advent of social media: as an example, she showed us photographs taken during World War Two that were touched up before their publication in newspapers in order to present the desired narrative and influence readers’ emotions.

We also made site visits to Haart, the only NGO working on trafficking in Kenya, as well as to Mathare, a massive slum in Nairobi that is home to around 180,000 people and is one of the biggest informal settlements in the country. The latter, bustling and crowded with poor sanitation, is home to thousands of refugees from Uganda, Tanzania and other African countries. Haart has worked with trafficking victims from as far as Nepalas, as well as those from Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda, and also helped Kenyans who have been trafficked abroad.

We were told about a group of Kenyan women who had been trafficked to Libya and forced to undergo rituals allegedly involving witchcraft. They were told that should they attempt to leave Libya, they would die. One woman became pregnant and fell very ill due to complications. She died as they tried to take her to hospital, making the others fear that witchcraft might also take their lives. The Haart NGO team that had travelled to Libya to counsel these women worked very hard to convince them to return to Kenya, where they now live.

I also met a brave survivor, Tamara from Uganda, who told her story of having been trafficked on the pretext of getting a media broadcasting job in the US. Still a college student, she had surrendered her passport and paid money to a trafficker, who subsequently raped her. For a long time, she told no one about her ordeal, save her mother, so ashamed she was. It is humbling to watch Tamara as she now works to raise awareness of this issue in her country as a journalist.
    
I highly recommend this Lab to those working on human rights who wish to deepen their understanding of the issue of trafficking, as well as seasoned experts in the field. London, the destination for the next Lab in November, here we come!

Published on August 13, 2018.

Further Articles

Care and Inclusiveness as Values for Diplomacy
86% of people want a more equitable and sustainable world after COVID-19, according to a recent study. Can we achieve this goal if we continue to do the same as we did before this crisis?
GDL Talks – Daring to Change: Alternative Ideas to Address Current Global Challenges
With pressing issues around the globe, it is more important than ever to break patterns that lead us to business as usual. The GDL Talks at the 2020 prE-Summit brought powerful and inspirational ideas on how to face some of the current global challenges.
City-to-city Diplomacy
In an article written for the Brookings Institution, GDL member Max Bouchet is discussing city-to-city diplomacy with regard to the Covid-19 crisis and gives an insight into its potential.
Elizabeth Maloba on the Empowerment of Women in Africa
In an interview with the BMW Foundation, GDL member Elizabeth Maloba is discussing the empowerment of women and the importance of the Gender Alliance for rising awareness of gender equality.
The Colours of Inspiration: Raising the Flag of the GDL
Read about GDL Member Jörg Reckhenrich’s flag workshop during the 10th Lab in Accra, in which he harnessed artwork and creativity to connect members and trigger ideas for solving political challenges.
United World Colleges
Eirliani Abdul Rahman recently joined the Community Engagement Committee (CEC) of the United World Colleges (UWC) International Board as a volunteer. Founded in 1962, the UWC is an educational movement.The objective is to help 16-19 year old students to develop resilience.
Cookie Policy
This website uses cookies to help us customise your experience and to provide optimal functionality. To learn more about cookies and their benefit and how you can control them, please view our cookie policy. By closing this message, you agree to the use of cookies.